• No products in the cart.
Checkout

South Yarra Dental Group

Dental Information

Health Mouth & Health Body

Taking good care of your mouth — teeth and gums — does more than help ensure you have a bright, white smile.

A healthy mouth and healthy body go hand in hand. Good oral hygiene and oral health can improve your overall health, reducing the risk of serious disease and perhaps even preserving your memory in your golden years. The phrase “healthy mouth, healthy you” really is true — and backed by growing scientific evidence.

It’s never too early to start teaching your children to take care of their teeth and gums: Healthy habits learned in childhood can pay off in adulthood. And, if you’re tempted to shrug off your good oral hygiene habits — brushing, flossing, rinsing with an antiseptic mouthwash, and seeing your dentist regularly — remember that you’re a role model for your kids. Keep in mind these six ways that healthy teeth and gums boost overall health.

Boosts Your Self-esteem and Confidence

Decayed teeth and gum disease are often associated not only with an unsightly mouth but very bad breath — so bad it can affect your confidence, self-image, and self-esteem. With a healthy mouth that’s free of gum disease and cavities, your quality of life is also bound to be better — you can eat properly, sleep better, and concentrate with no aching teeth or mouth infections to distract you.

May Lower Risk of Heart Disease

Chronic inflammation from gum disease has been associated with the development of cardiovascular problems such as heart disease, blockages of blood vessels, and strokes. Experts stop short of saying there is a cause-and-effect between gum disease and these other serious health problems, but the link has shown up in numerous studies. The findings of these studies may suggest that maintaining oral health can help protect overall health.

Preserves Your Memory

Adults with gingivitis (swollen, bleeding gums) performed worse on tests of memory and other cognitive skills than did those with healthier gums and mouths according the latest research. Those with gingivitis were more likely to perform poorly on two tests: delayed verbal recall and subtraction — both skills used in everyday life. Using an antibacterial mouthwash or toothpaste can help reduce bacteria in the mouth that can cause gingivitis.

Reduces Risks of Infection and Inflammation in Your Body

Poor oral health has been linked with the development of infection in other parts of the body. Research has found an association between gum disease and rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease that causes inflammation of the joints. Experts say the mechanism of the destruction of connective tissues in both gum disease and RA is similar. Eating a balanced diet, seeing your dentist regularly, and good oral hygiene helps reduce your risks of tooth decay and gum disease. Make sure you brush twice a day and floss and use an antiseptic mouthwash once a day.

Helps Keep Blood Sugar Stable if You Have Diabetes

People with uncontrolled diabetes often have gum disease. Having diabetes can make you less able to fight off infection, including gum infections that can lead to serious gum disease. And some experts have found that if you have diabetes, you are more likely to develop more severe gum problems than someone without diabetes. That, in turn, may make it more difficult to control blood sugar levels.Reducing your risk of gingivitis by protecting your oral health may help with blood sugar control if you have been diagnosed with diabetes.

Helps Pregnant Women Carry a Baby to Term

Women may experience increased gingivitis during pregnancy. Some research suggests a relationship between gum disease and preterm, low-birthweight infants. Not all studies have found a solid link, but maintaining good oral health is still the best goal. If you’re pregnant, visit your dentist as part of your prenatal care. Consider it good practice for the role modeling that lies ahead for all new parents.

Phillips Zoom Whitening

Philips Zoom in-chair whitening can achieve up to 8 shades whiter teeth in just 1 hour.

Teeth Whitening Melbourne

If you are considering whitening options for your teeth, please arrange an appointment with one of our practitioners to discuss your treatment options and to determine your suitability.

At South Yarra Dental Group, we offer the latest in Teeth Whitening Technology, Philips Zoom Whitespeed. Philips Zoom Teeth Whitening is a safe and effective way to whiten your teeth by up to eight shades. While other non-professional whitening products may cause harm to teeth and gums, using Philips Zoom with Relief ACP actually gives you greater protection and care for your whiter tooth enamel.

South Yarra Dental Group has extensive experience with Philips Zoom teeth whitening. We’ve been a provider of  Zoom Teeth Whitening in Melbourne & Australia over 10 years!

Zoom WhiteSpeed is the only in-office system that has a variable intensity setting so each treatment can be customised to maximize patient comfort. The system also includes desensitizers to help minimize sensitivity and protect your enamel. Our dental practitioners are given further training by Philips Zoom to ensure it is delivered safely and effectively. Philips Zoom has been clinically proven to whiten up to eight shades so you can achieve a brighter, whiter smile in just one hour. To determine your suitability, you must schedule an examination appointment.  Please call us on 98273314 or  CLICK HERE book online.

 

 

 

Water Fluoridation

Water fluoridation is the topping up of the levels of naturally occurring fluoride in the water to strengthen teeth against tooth decay. Fluorides are minerals found very commonly in the earth’s crust and in all water supplies. American scientists in the 1930s found that people living in towns with higher levels of fluoride in the water experienced less tooth decay than people living in areas with much lower levels of fluoride. Community water fluoridation began in America in 1945 and spread rapidly once its effectiveness against tooth decay became obvious.

Continue reading

Water Picks

Water irrigations devices – those small instruments the dentist uses to spray a high-powered stream of water in your mouth, can be useful in cleaning trapped debris in between your teeth.

But these kinds of devices, including so-called ‘water picks’, should never be used as a substitute for tooth brushing and flossing.

Continue reading

Health Products

Visit any pharmacy or the health and beauty section of a supermarket today, and you are faced with a large, and many say confusing, array of over-the-counter remedies and devices designed to help you tend to your hygiene and health care needs.

There are many high-quality products on the market today. There also are many products of questionable value. As one dental professional puts it, ‘Do they put ginkgo biloba in the new natural toothpastes so patients will remember to brush their teeth?’

Continue reading

Scaling and Root Planing

Some cases of acute periodontal (gum) disease that do not respond to more conventional treatment and self-care such as flossing may require a special kind of cleaning called scaling and root planing.

The procedure begins with administration of a local anaesthetic to reduce any discomfort. Then, a small instrument called a ‘scaler’, or an ultrasonic cleaner, is used to clean beneath your gum line to remove plaque and tartar.

The root surfaces on the tooth are then planed and smoothed. This lets the gum tissue heal and reattach itself to the tooth.

Maxillofacial Surgery

Maxillofacial surgery is a branch of dentistry that deals with surgical procedures of the head and neck, including the mouth and tooth structures.

Flap Surgery

Your bone and gum tissue should fit snugly around your teeth like a turtleneck. When you have periodontal disease, this supporting tissue and bone is destroyed, forming pockets around the teeth. Over time, these pockets become deeper, providing a larger space for bacteria to thrive and wreak havoc.

As bacteria accumulate and advance under the gum tissue in these deep pockets, additional bone and tissue loss follow. Eventually, if too much bone is lost, the teeth will need to be extracted.

Continue reading

Extraction

In most cases, a tooth may need to be pulled when other, less radical procedures such as amalgams or restoration make it impossible or imprudent to save your original tooth.

Advanced anaesthetic techniques today greatly minimize discomfort associated with a tooth extraction. First, the area surrounding the tooth is numbed to lessen any discomfort. After the extraction, you are given a regimen to follow to ensure that no infection occurs and your gum tissues heal properly. In most cases, a small amount of bleeding is normal.

Continue reading

Cosmetic Surgery

In addition to procedures to treat periodontal disease, many periodontists also perform Cosmetic Dentistry to enhance your smile. Often, patients who pursue Cosmetic Dentistry notice improved function as well. Cosmetic Dentistry include:

  • Crown lengthening
  • Soft tissue grafts
  • Ridge augmentation